Issue 18
July 2022
Flood Control District hires new Chief of Staff
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This month, Ronnie Dampier began his duties as the Harris County Flood Control District’s Chief of Staff. As the new Chief of Staff, Mr. Dampier will be responsible for leading the Executive Director's newly created Executive Office and expanding collaboration across the Flood Control District. The Chief of Staff position was created to facilitate deeper connectivity and collaboration across all Flood Control District Divisions. Additionally, this important role will help the Flood Control District deliver on its priorities by leading cross-functional initiatives and strategic operations.

Safety Corner
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Click here to read the most recent tips to stay safe during this hot summer season

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Charles Bowman
Construction Inspector
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How long have you been with the Flood Control District?

I have had the pleasure of working for the Flood District for nearly 4 years. 
 

How did you get your start at the Flood Control District?

A Construction Division interview gave me a great opportunity to learn the discipline of Civil Engineering. It’s been an exciting journey so far. 
 

What does your job at the Flood Control District entail?

My focus as an Inspector in the Construction Division is to observe, report and inspect contractors’ construction processes to ensure that the project plans are adhered to by the respective contractor. I am responsible for ensuring the contractor constructs items in accordance with the Flood Control District specifications and utilizes sound judgement while adhering to local, state and federal guidelines. 
 

What is your favorite thing about working at the Flood Control District?

Working with a group of individuals that support one another in accomplishing the Flood Control District’s mission and goals, while serving the citizens of Harris County. 
 

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now? 

Riggs Stormwater Detention Basin 
 

What has been your favorite project so far?

Brays Bayou watershed and the subsequent Project D100-00-00-E011 (channel conveyance improvements along Brays Bayou from S. Rice to Fondren.)
 

What is the best career lesson you’ve learned so far?

“Believe none of what you hear and half of what you see. Construction is a fluid environment. Don’t take everything personal. Constructive criticism allows you to grow. An inspector must see the grey to be successful - civil engineering isn’t black and white.”  
 

What is something about yourself that most people don't know? 

I love gardening. 
 

What is something about you that people would be surprised to know?

Safety on the project site is paramount and is my first priority as Inspector for the Flood Control District. 
 

What was your first job?

In 1992, I worked as a Kennel Assistant at Candy Land Farms, in Spring, Texas, for Ms. Barbara Leonard, who was the owner of “World Champion Standard Poodles.”
 

What do you like most about your job?

That personal gratification when closing out a project. There is no better feeling when the contractor completes their punch-list and removes all the equipment and the site restoration has been completed. 
 

What motivates you to wake up and go to work?

Taking care of my family and never taking for granted the blessings we have received. I believe in the future of the Flood Control District, its mission and what we all work towards: to bring forth a better tomorrow for the citizens we serve, with faith born not of words, but of deeds.

The Work Continues
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Flood Control District construction crews are nearing completion on the final segments of approximately 4 miles of channel conveyance improvements as part of the $100 million Project Hunting. The partnership effort with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will reduce the flood risk in central Harris County from U.S. 59 to North Wayside Drive for more than 4,000 homes in the 1 percent (100-year) floodplain.More information at hcfcd.org/C-18.

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More than 42,000 cubic yards of material has been excavated from the project site of a future stormwater detention basin in the San Jacinto River watershed, near Kingwood Park High School under an Excavation & Removal agreement. 

More information at https://bit.ly/3uj6NKh

Project Update
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Drainage improvements along Tributary P118-21-00 will widen the channel to increase its capacity while also shifting the channel to the west to limit impacts to the surrounding community.  

Along Aldine Mail Route Road and to the north, the channel will be extended in support of drainage improvements to the Western Homes subdivision project that will be constructed through a partnership with the Harris County Engineering Department. Learn more at hcfcd.org/C25

Construction Update
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Clearing vegetation & dirt removal began in a project site of a future stormwater detention basin in the Cedar Bayou watershed near FM 1960. The site is expected to be an active construction zone for up to 3 years. 

Learn more at http://hcfcd.org/F45

Townhome Complex Demolished to Avoid Future Flood Damage 

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The Forest Cove Townhomes, a complex in Kingwood that was once comprised of more than 80 individually owned units, has experienced severe repetitive flooding and ultimately became an unwanted dumping ground after Hurricane Harvey. The Flood Control District acquired all of these units as part of our flood risk reduction efforts in the San Jacinto River watershed. Teams have demolished two more of the buildings, with the last building slated for demolition in early August. 

 

Purchasing and demolishing properties located deep in the floodplain is one tool in our flood risk reduction toolbox. Because of their location, flood risk for these properties cannot be adequately reduced through structural flood risk reduction projects. The Flood Control District’s Property Acquisition Program eliminates future flood damage and reduces health and safety risks for owners and first responders during heavy rain events, while also providing public open space. 

Sign up for Flood Warning System alerts to stay safe during Hurricane Season
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In this month’s issue, our very own meteorologist Jeff Lindner showcases a critical tool to stay safe during Hurricane Season: the Flood Warning System (FWS)! The FWS can show you real-time information regarding rainfall and flooding around the Houston area. The service operates 24/7, day or night and is capable of sending your customized rain/flood information biased on your location. Check out the video above and don’t forget to sign up at FWSAlerts.org or HarrisCountyFWS.org.

Executive Director meets with Houston Stronger

Photo Credit: Houston Stronger
 

Earlier this month, Harris County Flood Control District Executive Director, Dr. Tina Petersen, met with the board of Houston Stronger, a coalition of civic groups, business associations and active citizens from throughout the Texas Gulf Coast region. Dr. Petersen briefed the board about the current state of projects within the Flood Control District and plans regarding flood risk reduction efforts moving forward.

Construction Engineer

Current Projects

Installation Power Buggy Rental
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